#111111

: Resources

Perception Survey on Communication Surveillance and Privacy of Human Rights Defenders in Kenya

The right to privacy is a fundamental right protected in law across the world including Kenya as
stipulated in the Bill of Rights in the 2010 Constitution. It is essential to the protection of human dignity
and serves as the foundation upon which many other rights are built. Privacy denotes “that area of
individual autonomy in which human beings strive to achieve self realization … alone or together
with others.”

Human rights work demands use of communication tools ranging from face-to-face, telephones
and e-mails and short message services (SMS). All these provide varied degrees of risk, which are
also specific to the work the HRDs are engaged in, as well as contexts. Numerous Kenyan HRDs have
raised concerns about their mobile phones being tapped and their communication intercepted.
These experiences have implications for HRDs and, therefore, it is essential to ensure that HRDs are
not the subject of unlawful surveillance practices and that they are able to do their work without
fear of snooping by anyone.

This report analyses the needs, concerns and areas of interest for HRDs in relation to privacy, data
protection and communications surveillance. It also establishes how surveillance impacts HRDs work
and their role as actors of change in society. Examining the risk levels based on these specifics as
well as finding the best-suited measures will be important for continued HRDs protection.

This survey set out to:
• Assess HRDs’ level of exposure, understanding, and perception of communication surveillance;
• Document HRDs’ current strategies for mitigating, perceived or actual communication
surveillance.

See the Fact Sheet of the Research here: https://wp.me/aagr4K-NA

To receive the entire report, Download it via:  info@hrdcoalition.org

Race against Extinction: The Plight of Sengwer Indigenous Women and HRDs in Embobut Forest

The Sengwer are a minority and marginalized hunter-gatherer indigenous community who occupy
present-day West Pokot, Trans-Nzoia, and Elgeyo Marakwet Counties. Over the years, the Kenyan
government, through the Kenya Forest Service (KFS) and other security agencies has made
attempts to evict the indigenous group from their land in Embobut forest under the guise of forest
conservation. These forceful evictions intensified in Embobut forest in December 2017. The Sengwer
homes were torched, crops and household items destroyed and their livestock disappeared. The
Sengwer community, particularly women, cried for help that hardly came.

These forceful evictions are human rights violations of the Sengwer as well as an infringement of
their rights to customary sustainable utilization of forest resources. In addition, the evictions deprive
the community the means of subsistence, integral to their identity, cultural survival, and forest life. It
is important to note that Article 63 of Kenya Constitution 2010 prescribes that an indigenous group
cannot be evicted from their ancestral territory without their Free, Prior and Informed Consent (FPIC).

See the Fact Sheet of the Research here: https://wp.me/aagr4K-Nw

To receive the entire report, write to us via: info@hrdcoalition.org

Midwifing the African Women Human Rights Defenders’ Platform

In July 2018, Urgent Action Fund Africa (UAF-Africa) brought together forty-five women human rights defenders (WHRDs) from across Africa and the diaspora to discuss the possibility of creating a platform that would facilitate more durable ways of supporting WHRDs and feminists working on the front line of social justice movements. National Coalition of Human Rights Defenders Kenya was represented by the Protection Officer, Salome Nduta who is also in charge of WHRDs program in the organisation.

The meeting drew together activists working across a range of issues from political governance, sexual and reproductive health rights, environmental and economic justice, arts activism, conflict and peacebuilding and Lesbian Bisexual Trans* Queer and Intersex (LBTQI) rights.

The overarching goal of the convening was to begin the process of defining a framework for a Holistic security, safety, wellbeing and collective care platform for African WHRDs that potentially provides litigation support, psychosocial support, training in individual and collective protection and security as well as network and engage in various lobbying and advocacy activities.

Read the Full report here: https://hrdcoalition.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/11/UAF-Africa-Abuja-Feminist-Republik-Abuja_Report-30.09.18.pdf

NAIROBI HUMAN RIGHTS DEFENDERS NETWORK CAPACITY AUDIT REPORT

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

Based on key findings, some issues emerged in the report. First, majority of the Human Rights Defenders (HRDs) in Nairobi County have tertiary education, most are engaged in self- employment, and 80% are affiliated to organisation which are pro-human rights defenders and 69% do not have regular income.

Secondly, the work of human rights defenders is important to promote and protect human rights and the rule of law. This can be achieved through regular training on the rights of HRDs. The report identified that 85% of the human rights defenders need support on human rights and advocacy, support further training on human rights, support on
self-care, support on medical care and employment opportunities.

Finally, there is need for National Coalition of Human Rights Defenders-Kenya and other stake holders to organize regular human rights training workshops for HRDs. Training for human rights defenders should include training on professionalizing their work as well as on relevant security precautions.Training should involve capacity building that equip human rights defenders with practical knowledge and skills that can enable them acquire gainful employment besides being human rights defenders. Training on practical skills like report writing, data entry technique and analysis, investigative research are recommended.

Download the report here: https://wp.me/aagr4K-MF

Data Protection Guide

The Keys to Data Protection: A guide for policy engagement on data protection

In this section, you can access the different parts of our guide for policy engagement on data protection “The Keys to Data Protection”. The guide is intended to help organisations and individuals improve their understanding of data protection, by providing a framework to analyse the various provisions which are commonly presented in a data protection law.

The guide was developed from Privacy International’s experience and expertise on international principles and standards applicable to the protection of privacy and personal data, and our leadership and research on modern technologies and data processing.

Part 1 introduces data protection: what it is, how it works and why it is essential for the exercise of the right to privacy.

While data protection laws vary from country to country, there are some commonalities and minimum requirements, underpinned by data protection principles and standards which tend to be reflected in the structure and content of relevant legislation. Each part of the report presents these, including:

  • General provisions, definitions and scope (Part 2);
  • Data protection principles (Part 3);
  • The rights of data subjects (Part 4);
  • The grounds for processing personal data (Part 5);
  • The obligations of controllers and processors (Part 6); and
  • Oversight and enforcement structures (Part 7).

Part 8 provides some additional resources on data protection, and outlines opportunities for organisations to engage on data protection.

Much of our engagement on data protection for the last decade has been undertaken through our work with our partners in the Privacy International Network. We would like to take the opportunity to acknowledge their incredible efforts to promote and advocate for the adoption of data protection laws across the world.

Please reach out to Privacy Internation on  email if you have any feedback on the guide via: info@privacyinternational.org

Submission of Comments on the Data Protection Bill 2018 – July 2018

Submission of Comments on the Data Protection Bill, 2018 - July 2018_Final

Translate »